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What is a Trekkie?

A Trekkie is a devoted fan of the iconic science fiction franchise, "Star Trek." They celebrate the series through conventions, fan fiction, and a shared language of quotes and lore. This passionate community transcends generations, united by a love for exploration and the progressive ideals embodied by the Starship Enterprise. Ever wondered what it's like to be part of this cosmic fellowship? Join us as we explore the universe of Trekkies.
Tricia Christensen
Tricia Christensen
Tricia Christensen
Tricia Christensen

A trekkie is a term sometimes used for avid fans of the Star Trek television franchises. Some fans take offense at this term, however, and prefer to be called "trekkers." There is significant dispute on this point, however, with some fans considering "trekkies" to be people who are obsessed with the show and, "have no life," while someone who is just a big fan is a "trekker." Others use the term to mean any fan of the franchise, and to add to the confusion, Gene Rodenberry, the creator of Star Trek, referred to all fans as trekkies. Leonard Nimoy, the actor who played the beloved Mr. Spock, prefers the term trekker. "Trekkie" is the more commonly used.

The first trekkies were probably members of the fan organization, STARFLEET International, started in 1974. Many loved the first Star Trek series, and especially its attitude toward global and universal responsibility. The show tended to be similar in nature to the goals of cultural anthropology, to watch, but not interfere with other cultures. It is fair to say, however, that the original series often interfered with other cultures, particularly in the way the captain of the ship took liberties with various female aliens.

The cultural stereotype that all Trekkies are antisocial males is mistaken.
The cultural stereotype that all Trekkies are antisocial males is mistaken.

The series was the first to promote cultural equality, however, and it was noted for its inclusion of a black woman, an Asian man, and a Russian as important members of the ship. In this way, Star Trek had really gone where “no man has gone before” in its promotion of racial equality. The series was short-lived, but inspired a huge fan base. Shortly after the demise of the series, members of the cast began to appear at fan conventions, and eventually, conventions devoted solely to the series developed.

The multicultural approach of the Star Trek franchise has attracted people from all walks of life to Trekkie clubs.
The multicultural approach of the Star Trek franchise has attracted people from all walks of life to Trekkie clubs.

A trekkie could simply be an interested fan who attended local conventions, or he or she could be someone who really took the Star Trek world quite seriously. A dedicated fan might give himself an official Star Fleet title, as was noted in the alternate juror of the Whitewater Trials in the US, who in real life asked to be addressed as Lieutenant Commander. He or she might also be part of a group building a life size star-ship model, or might build one of his or her own.

Many people are attracted to the events, such as Klingon beauty pageants, that are held by Trekkie clubs.
Many people are attracted to the events, such as Klingon beauty pageants, that are held by Trekkie clubs.

People outside fandom, or Trekdom, began to consider the trekkie as synonymous with someone who walked around with rubber Vulcan ears, and who might be slightly distanced from real life outside of Star Trek activities. While it is true that this kind of fan clearly exists, and may travel across the country to attend multiple conventions, most simply enjoy being fans of the different series in the franchise. A “normal” trekkie might attend conventions, may be part of a fan organization, and may have a title or character that he or she dresses up as when appropriate. This can be taken quite seriously by some fans; some who go dressed as Klingons, for example, have learned the Klingon language and will often converse only in it.

For those outside the fictional world, attending one of these conventions is an interesting study. Outsiders will see a mixed example of both the rabid, and the more rational fan.

Many Trekkies have specific characters they follow.
Many Trekkies have specific characters they follow.

The original Star Trek and the many follow-up series have created a new legion of trekkies. Star Trek: The Next Generation especially has inspired many new fans, as it furthered the ideals of tolerance. The quirks of the rabid trekkie are apt to promote intolerance or at least good-natured parody.

The film Trekkies and its sequel Trekkies 2 are documentaries that follow the lives of the more rabid fans, while the film Galaxy Quest affectionately pokes fun at them. William Shatner’s appearance on Saturday Night Live also took a jab at trekkies in a skit. Shatner played himself in the skit and began to insult his fans at a convention, telling them that Star Trek was a TV show, and they should really get a life.

Frequently Asked Questions

What is a Trekkie?

A Trekkie is a fan of the Star Trek franchise, which includes television series, movies, books, and more. The term originated in the 1970s and has come to represent a dedicated community of enthusiasts who often engage in activities such as attending conventions, creating fan fiction, and discussing the intricacies of the Star Trek universe. Trekkies are known for their deep knowledge of the franchise and their passion for its themes of exploration, diversity, and technology.

How did the term 'Trekkie' originate?

The term 'Trekkie' was first used in the 1960s, not long after the original Star Trek series began airing. It gained popularity as fans of the show started to form a distinct subculture. The term was possibly coined by the media or by the fans themselves as a way to identify their growing community. It has since become synonymous with Star Trek fandom and is recognized worldwide.

What differentiates a Trekkie from a casual Star Trek fan?

A Trekkie is typically more invested in the Star Trek universe than a casual fan. They often possess an encyclopedic knowledge of the franchise, participate in fan clubs, attend conventions like Star Trek Las Vegas, and may even learn the Klingon language. Casual fans might enjoy watching the shows or movies but do not usually engage in the broader community activities that Trekkies do.

Are there any notable gatherings or events for Trekkies?

Yes, there are several notable events for Trekkies, including the annual Star Trek convention in Las Vegas, which is one of the largest gatherings of Star Trek fans in the world. Other events include Star Trek: The Cruise, regional conventions, and various fan meet-ups. These events often feature appearances by actors from the series, panels, autograph sessions, and opportunities for fans to immerse themselves in the Star Trek culture.

How has the Trekkie community impacted the Star Trek franchise?

The Trekkie community has had a significant impact on the Star Trek franchise. Their dedication and advocacy have been credited with helping to bring the original series back into syndication and ultimately paving the way for future series and movies. The community's enthusiasm and support have also influenced the direction of the franchise, with producers and writers often engaging with fans to gauge their interests and preferences. The Trekkie community continues to be a driving force behind the enduring popularity of Star Trek.

Tricia Christensen
Tricia Christensen

Tricia has a Literature degree from Sonoma State University and has been a frequent WiseTour contributor for many years. She is especially passionate about reading and writing, although her other interests include medicine, art, film, history, politics, ethics, and religion. Tricia lives in Northern California and is currently working on her first novel.

Learn more...
Tricia Christensen
Tricia Christensen

Tricia has a Literature degree from Sonoma State University and has been a frequent WiseTour contributor for many years. She is especially passionate about reading and writing, although her other interests include medicine, art, film, history, politics, ethics, and religion. Tricia lives in Northern California and is currently working on her first novel.

Learn more...

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Discussion Comments

anon95174

trekkies are pretty cool. continuing with the Star Trek series' diversity in cultures (alien and human) and connecting with each other around the planet. Lots of fun. Novel. Kudos to one and all. Engage!

anon84463

Didn't really like the use of the term "rabid" makes us trekkies (not trekkers) like some kind of animal.

anon39583

Lol, at first glance, the immediate thought that came to me was trekking. Seems like I'm galaxies away!

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    • The cultural stereotype that all Trekkies are antisocial males is mistaken.
      By: pop culture geek
      The cultural stereotype that all Trekkies are antisocial males is mistaken.
    • The multicultural approach of the Star Trek franchise has attracted people from all walks of life to Trekkie clubs.
      By: Karl Palutke
      The multicultural approach of the Star Trek franchise has attracted people from all walks of life to Trekkie clubs.
    • Many people are attracted to the events, such as Klingon beauty pageants, that are held by Trekkie clubs.
      By: Hillary
      Many people are attracted to the events, such as Klingon beauty pageants, that are held by Trekkie clubs.
    • Many Trekkies have specific characters they follow.
      Many Trekkies have specific characters they follow.